History of the city of Mount Pleasant, Tennessee

History

Mount Pleasant is a city in Maury County, Tennessee, United States. Area: total – 12.60 sq mi (32.64 km2). Population in 2017 – 4,847. Mount Pleasant is situated in a relatively broad plain surrounded by low hills to the east, south, and west. U.S. Route 43 connects the city with Columbia to the northeast and Lawrenceburg to the south.

Settlement of Mount Pleasant began in the early 19th century, and increased following the construction of the Military Road connecting Nashville and Madisonville, Louisiana, in 1817. By the time Mount Pleasant incorporated as a city in 1824, it was home to a store, tavern, and several churches.

In 1895, brown phosphate rock was discovered in Mount Pleasant, leading to a mining boom, and giving the city its nickname. Within a few years, ten phosphate mining companies were operating in Mount Pleasant, producing over 25,000 tons per year. Phosphate mining remained a major part of the city’s economy into the latter half of the 20th century.

The City of Mount Pleasant government consists of five elected commissioners, elected every four years. The City Manager is selected, by the commission, and is hired on a variable year contract.

Attraction

Mount Pleasant located in a picturesque piece of Southern countryside filled with shops that range from boutiques to dairy dip taking you back to a simpler time.

On the square there is an art installation dedicated chronicling the Trail of Tears and the Cherokee women who passed through Mount Pleasant.

Mount Pleasant was the birthplace of 19th-century writer and humorist Sam R. Watkins.

Walnut Grove is a historic house on a Southern plantation in Mount Pleasant, Maury County, Tennessee, USA.

Transport interchange

Mount Pleasant is also home to the Maury County Regional Airport.

Public transportation is provided by the Mule Town Trolley Service. The Mule Town Trolley connects people all across Maury County. The routes extend from Mount Pleasant to Columbia and on to Spring Hills. The fare is $1.00 each way and riders can request a stop anywhere along the trolley route.

 

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